Monday, January 19, 2015

Almonds - Oh Yes


I do like my almonds.  And that's a good thing.  Edgar Cayce, also known as the sleeping prophet, recorded some of his "readings" way back in the 1930's or so, and in them he made several references to the efficacy of this wonderful nut.  He said if you ate 2 or 3 almonds a day you would never need to fear getting cancer.

It was many years ago that I read his prediction that scientists would discover this fact by the end of the 20th century.  I have recently also read some interesting news that almonds can prove useful in lowering blood pressure, therefore helping one achieve a healthy heart.  And other, more recent articles, hail the ingestion of almonds in helping diabetics getting better health.

Way back, years ago, when I mentioned Cayce's observations to a friend, she was very pleased.  "So I could eat 2 Almond Joy candy bars a day and be protected from cancer?"  I responded that I wasn't sure that was the intent of his statement for he was an advocate for healthy eating, and thought the almonds could be used instead of meat products to get the proper nutrients that could be missing in a too-strict vegetarian diet.

Of course if one was predisposed to eat a candy bar, perhaps the Almond Joy would be a better choice than others.  This is my own opinion and not one I discovered in my reading.  Although I wouldn't advise taking them for daily consumption as a cancer or heart disorders prevention.

Here's wishing you a healthy New Year.  And just maybe (if you are so inclined) the enjoyable taste of a few almonds every now and then.





Monday, January 5, 2015

Savoring Life

Salt has been around since creation and is found is areas all over the world.  And it has been used by people for who knows how long. 

Evidence has been discovered showing salt extraction and drying going back to 6051 BC in Romania.  And in China they have found a verifiable salt works dating to 6000 BC.  The use of salt is necessary for healthy human development.

Of course too much of a good thing can cause you health problems as well.  That's certainly true for modern mankind.  I read somewhere that food companies will use 5 billion pounds of salt a year in their industry.  This number seems absolutely astronomical, but it could very well be true.

The very first patent was issued in North America to Samuel Winslow for his new process in making salt.  I could not find any information on just what this process was, but it would be interesting to know.

Salt is used as a compliment, as in "He's the salt of the earth."  And it can be used as a caution:  "Take it with a grain of salt."  But it is still a necessity.  One quote I liked was from Helen Rowland:  "A wise woman puts a grain of sugar into everything she says to man, and takes a grain of salt with everything he says to her."

Nelson Mandela once said:  "Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all."  That pretty well covers what we all need to have a sustainable life with a chance of success.

I say to you:  May your life be flavored with enough salt to make it interesting but not so much you produce salty tears of grief."

Enjoy.

Monday, December 29, 2014

Food & Fun in 2015



January:       A jovial jubilee with celebration in the air
                     Start the year with Jackrabbit stew, if you dare.
February:     A fabulous festival, now don't get the jitters
                     We'll have some fudge and fruit fritters.
March:          A merry month of marvelous mirth
                     With milk and meatballs from the
                      land of your birth.
April:            An amazing assembly alementation
                     Apples and almonds produce salivation.
May:             A mysterious mass of a mob of people
                     Eating macaroni and muffins below the steeple..
June:             A joyous jambalaya under the sun
                      Let's have jams and juice and Jamaican rum.
July:              A joking jabberwocky-filled jamboree
                      Who's bringing the jam and jelly beans?
August:          An amorous alliance, who's counting the cost?
                       Bring the almonds and applesauce.
September:     A sagacious symposium run by the boss
                       He wants sauerkraut, salsa and squash
October:         An obligatory observance is in the loop.
                       This calls for ostrich eggs and oxtail soup.
November:     The neighbors nuptials have a redneck theme
                       With bowls of nachos, neck bones and nectarines.
December:      A daring demographic dazzles the crowd
                       Serving duck and dumplings and dessert - Oh wow!




Monday, December 22, 2014

Ah - Relaxation


Life can be fun, exciting, entertaining, stressful.  All these things and more.  And when it gets just a bit too much of whatever is going on, it's good to have a way to relax.  Fortunately I have many ways to lose myself in some form of activity and just let the world go by.

One way is to do a little painting.  I'm certainly not a true artist.  No one is ever going to want to buy one of my "works of art," but I get what I need from the activity.  This painting  has no title, maybe someone can suggest something suitable.  It's done in acrylic paint, about 16 by 20, and I have it hanging in my computer room.  I enjoy looking at it.  (But then I can be easily amused.)

I'd love to hear how my cyberfriends like to relax and get away from the stresses that can befall all of us.  Please feel free to share.

Take care and may you all have a wonderful week full of holiday cheer and lots of time with good friends.  Merry Christmas to everyone.

Monday, December 15, 2014

It's Christmas

                 (This post was first published on this site in Dec. 2012.  I hope you
                   enjoy the repeat. - Karen)

It's that time again, isn't it?  So for your consideration I present the lyrics to a song I wrote a long time ago.  First, though, let's set the scene.

It's late at night, the lights are dim, a little blues music is wafting through the air.  There is a fire in the fireplace in the snug cottage as you look out the window to snow falling softly blanketing the ground.  (Think Norman Rockwell or Thomas Kincaid.)  And someone sings softly.

                         Come On, Santa

Christmas time is coming and I'm making a list
Won't you tell me, Santa, can I have what I wish?
I want someone to love me, to hold me good and tight
So hurry up, Santa, swing on down tonight.

Chorus:    I hear jingle bells and tiny reindeer
                 Please tell me Santa, are you getting near?
                 You have got my address and I will be at home
                 Come on Santa, don't leave me alone.

I've been singing Christmas carols and decking the hall
I'm getting ready for old Santa to call
Bringing what I need to fill my lonely nights
So hurry up, Santa, swing on down tonight.

Chorus:

I have been so good, Santa, you would not believe
Looking forward to what is under my tree
If Santa got my letter and he read it just right
So hurry up, Santa, swing on down tonight.

Chorus:

Come here you jolly old elf.



Monday, December 8, 2014

Distorted Life's Journey



It can happen to anybody.  You start off with a plan.  It may even be well defined and clear in your mind.  Then something happens.  You don't know how or why it happens, but all of a sudden your vision becomes distorted or a bit blurred.  You seem to have lost your way.  Do you quit, or do you find a way to go on?

It isn't always easy to go on.  How do you do it?  All I know is, you just have to come to the understanding that you can either stand still or move.  And to me, movement is always the better course.  But how can you move when things are so bleak?  A few suggestions I have found helpful:

     1)  Step back and take time to reflect on what may have happened.
     2)  If you have taken an emotional blow, give yourself time to get past it.  But not so much time you find it easier to be totally inactive.
     3)  Remember that you can't change others, you can only work on yourself.  So focus on what you need to do to help yourself go on.
      4)  Spend a little time on your Attitude of Gratitude journal.  It's always nice to reflect of the blessings you have rather than the things you feel are lacking in your life.
     5)  Rethink your goals.  Is it possible you've missed a step or tried to take a giant step when it's time for baby steps for a particularly difficult phase?
     6)  Pick a date and plant yourself in the right place to get yourself going again.

I like a quote attributed to Oliver Wendell Holmes:
     Even if you are on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there.

What about you?  What have you found helpful to get yourself looking forward to what can be rather than to what has faded into a distant past? 


Monday, December 1, 2014

What's Your Attitude?



I am eternally a dedicated optimist.  Oh, there are times I have my down periods, but they fortunately never last too long.  So when I decided to do a papier mache project in the form of my initial, I decided the completed form must denote an attitude.

This "K" came to mind when I momentarily had a thought of Steven Urkel, the character on the TV show Family Matters played so very well by Jaleel White.  To try to capture that attitude, I made it with a slightly backward bent with one foot projected forward while the other was placed to the side.

I put teal paint in the papier mache pulp and inserted a design of puzzle pieces.  When dried I wiped the piece with a thin layer of more teal paint  over the top of the piece, followed by polyurethane to make it water repellent.  The finished form stands about 20 inches tall.

To tie this in with my attitude I'll include a few quotes I like.

     The world is full of cactus, but we don't have to sit on it.  -  Will Foley

     I will not let anyone walk through my mind with their dirty feet.  -  Mahatma Gandhi

     Become a possibilitarian.  No matter how dark things seem to be or actually are,  raise
     your sights and see possibilities - always see them, for they are always there.  -
                                                                                                     Norman Vincent Peale